Wednesday, September 19, 2018

The Roundup with PW


Bertelsmann Buys OnCourse Learning: The German publishing group Bertelsmann bought the U.S. online education provider in a deal worth around $500 million.

Comic Books for Evacuees: The Golden Age Comics, New Krypton Comics, and Comics Exchange have teamed up to offer free comics to children from the Carolinas.

How Asia Feels About 'Crazy Rich Asians': Audience responses from China, Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines show a mixed response to the film.

When Hansberry Met Baldwin: James Baldwin and Lorraine Hansberry’s deep, years-long intellectual partnership went beyond their shared identity as queer black writers.

Ian McEwan's Thoughts on Adaptations: The author discusses adapting his own novels and the kinds of script notes that drive him "mad."

Off the Shelf


September 18, 2018
By
Meagan Harris

 

6 Fantastic Books New in Paperback This September

I’m so excited about the books newly released in paperback this month. There are a couple of terrific memoirs from powerful women, Isabel Allende’s latest novel, and a fun new book about an engineer-turned-baker. Stephen King fans will be happy to see his collaboration with Owen King released this month, as will anyone who is looking forward to reading a collection of short stories from America’s most beloved actor, Tom Hanks. The beginning of fall often brings a stellar publishing lineup and these paperbacks won’t disappoint!

Publishers Lunch


Today's Meal


Longtime New York Magazine contributing editor Boris Kachka has been named books editor as parent company New York Media aims to triple book coverage across the magazine and their various blogs. Kachka says, "We haven't really had someone overseeing books and it fell between the cracks too often. Books aren't like a lot of other media; there's the opportunity to seed them through lots of different sections." NY Magazine editor-in-chief Adam Moss adds: "Books have for years been pretty big areas of interest in our universe and on the site, according to all the metrics we have. We thought this was an area we could do a great deal more in, and now we are."

Michelle Herrera Mulligan has joined Atria as senior editor, reporting to Lindsay Sagnette, charged with helping "to champion writers from diverse and unexplored communities." She was the founding editor-in-chief of Cosmo For Latinas.

At Penguin Random House Audio, Sue Daulton has been promoted to senior vice president, operations; Amy Metsch moves up to senior vice president, associate publisher, editorial director; and Dan Zitt becomes senior vice president, content production.

Bridget O'Toole has been promoted to marketing manager at Berkley.

Tiffany Shelton has been promoted to assistant editor at St. Martin's.

Alfred Bertrand has joined Georgetown University Press as director. He replaces Richard Brown, who left in October 2017, and interim director Hope LeGro, who has held the post for the past year. Bertrand spent the last eight years at Princeton University Press, most recently as editor-in-chief.

Laura Usselman has been promoted to literary agent at Stuart Krichevsky Agency.

Author and former editorial director of Publishers Weekly Michael Coffey is joining the OR Books board of directors.

Franklin & Siegal Associates was appointed literary scout for 21. Szazad in Hungary, and Litera in Romania.

Beacon Press has renewed its sales and distribution partnership with Penguin Random House Publisher Services, which originated in 2010.

Casanovas & Lynch Literary Agency will represent Don Congdon Associates' titles in Spain, Portugal and Latin America, including Brazil.

Awards
The National Book Foundation announced that Doron Weber, vice president, programs and program director at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, will receive its Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community. Weber is being honored for his work running Sloan's program for the Public Understanding of Science, Technology & Economics, which has provided grants to help "commission, produce, and distribute media that connect the public with science in accessible and illuminating ways." Executive director of the NBF Lisa Lucas says, "At the National Book Foundation, we believe that the scope of literature is expansive; that it can and should open up entirely new worlds to its readers. Doron Weber is that principle in action. Firmly committed to the marriage of science and art, Weber has spent his career working to meet readers where they are, connecting them in creative ways to new ideas and modes of thinking."

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

BiblioHub: September 28 - October 3


BiblioHub: September 28 – October 3

As part of celebrating Devonport’s rich and diverse literary community, BiblioHub brings together local booksellers, book-makers, book writers of all genre, and book lovers.

BiblioHub events at Depot Artspace include:

BOOK LAUNCH: Geoff Allen: Fairies of Down Under and other Pakeha Fairy Tales, Published by Makaro Press:  Friday, 28 September, 5.30 – 7pm, The Depot Artspace, Devonport, Auckland.

BOOK LAUNCH: Mickey Smith: As You Will: Carnegie Libraries of the South Pacific, Published by Te Tuhi:  Saturday, 29 September, 2:00 - 4:00pm, The Depot Artspace, Devonport, Auckland

VERNACULAR LOUNGE: Michael King:  A Commemoration by the Michael King Writers Centre (Auckland Heritage Week) September 28 – October 15

FRANK SARGESON: 70th Anniversary of the Sargeson House

DEPOT MAIN GALLERY DISPLAYS 

• Paradox Books 
• Devonport Library Associates 
• Flagstaff
• Bookmark 
• Depot Press 

All listed events take place at:
Depot Artspace
28 Clarence Street
Devonport
Auckland
New Zealand

Phone: (09) 963 2331

See our opening hours here.

Auckland Writers Festival Launches Literary Foundation



 
A new Foundation established by the Auckland Writers Festival aims to strengthen Aotearoa’s literary landscape.

The Mātātuhi Foundation, launched this evening, will provide opportunities for New Zealand writers to develop and promote their works and for readers to increase their engagement with the work of local writers and will fund activities that contribute to literacy in this country.

Auckland Writers Festival Chair, Pip Muir says the launch of the Mātātuhi Foundation is the next step in the realisation of a long-held dream.

“When the Festival began almost 20 years’ ago, meetings were held around a kitchen table. Since then, the appetite to engage with writers from New Zealand and around the world has grown exponentially and with it the opportunity to deepen our commitment to our literary landscape.

“It is absolutely fantastic that the Festival has reached a point where it can further contribute to the national reading and writing community. We are thrilled to be able support the nation’s literature with the launch of this ground-breaking initiative.”

The Foundation will operate independently of the Auckland Writers Festival Trust and initially aims to make up to ten one-off grants of $2000 - $5000 per year whilst building an endowment platform to support its long-term endeavours.

 Inaugural Committee members are professional director and senior finance executive Anne Blackburn (Chair), writer and academic Paula Morris, Festival Trust Board Chair and lawyer Pip Muir, Auckland Writers Festival Director Anne O’Brien and country head of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand and Book Council board member Peter Vial.

Ms Blackburn says she relishes the opportunity to work with an organisation that supports New Zealand literature.

“I very much look forward to receiving applications from groups that seek to engage more readers and also from our writers, whose words and ideas enrich our lives.”
 
Applicants are invited to submit expressions of interest twice a year, with deadlines of 31 October and 31 May

Off the Shelf



 

10 Highly Anticipated Book-to-Film Adaptations to Read This Fall

Fall is here and with it a new crop of book-to-movie adaptations that are sure to entertain, make you cry, make you laugh, and even make you think. But while there’s still time before theaters fill up, make sure you’re caught up on all the books behind these must-see films.

The Roundup with PW


Murakami Withdraws From Alt-Nobel: The novelist had been shortlisted for a Swedish award running in place of scandal-hit honor, but has declined his nomination.

French Bookshops Decry Prizewinner: Booksellers in France are revolting against the prestigious Prix Renaudot longlist, which includes a novel distributed only by Amazon.

A Suburban Library in Pa. Matters: After two years and $7.1 million in renovations, the Radnor Memorial Library near Philadelphia is proof that suburban libraries are still vital.

The 'NYRB'–Ghomeshi Controversy: Why the 'New York Review of Books' published a controversial essay by Jian Ghomeshi, who was accused of sexual and physical assault in 2014.

Bookstores Find Creative Ways to Thrive: In the age of Amazon, independent booksellers are using unorthodox methods of staying open and prosperous.
 
VIEW ALL »

BOOKMAN'S ABSENCE

The Bookman will be away overseas visiting family until mid-October and while continuing to post to the blog there may be gaps from time to time.

Publishers Lunch


Today's Meal

Russell Busse has joined Abrams Children's as senior editor, entertainment and licensed publishing. He was previously with Little, Brown Children's.

Masha Gunic has joined Azantian Literary Agency as junior literary agent. She was previously editorial assistant at Abrams.

The Frankfurt Book Fair named their new group of 16 Fellows (including Olivia Taylor Smith at Unnamed Press in the US).

Acquisitions
Hachette Book Group has closed their deal to acquire Christian publisher Worthy Publishing Group. Worthy's founding publisher and CEO Byron Williamson becomes vp, publishing development for Hachette Nashville, joining HBG's senior management group. Worthy sales and distribution will move to HBG in early 2019.

Awards
Hala Alyan's debut novel Salt Houses won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for fiction, while Ta-Nehisi Coates' We Were Eight Years in Power won for nonfiction. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee and Reading with Patrick by Michelle Kuo were named the fiction and nonfiction runners-up, respectively.

Separately, the six titles shortlist was announced for the £30,000 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year, with the winner to be named on November 12.

Bad Blood, by John Carreyrou (Knopf/Picador)
The Billionaire Raj, by James Crabtree (Tim Duggan Books/Oneworld)
Capitalism in America, by Alan Greenspan and Adrian Wooldridge (Penguin Press/Allen Lane)
Give People Money, by Annie Lowrey (Crown/WH Allen)
The Value of Everything, by Mariana Mazzucato (Public Affairs/Allen Lane)
New Power, by Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans (Doubleday/Pan Macmillan)

Canada's Giller Prize announced its longlist of 12 titles. Candidates include Patrick DeWitt's French Exit, Esi Edugyan's Washington Black, and Sheila Heti's Motherhood.

New book explores the whirlwind 2017 election


 

Victoria University Press book explores the whirlwind 2017 election

A new Victoria University Press (VUP) book examining the 2017 New Zealand general election has been officially launched in Wellington by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

Stardust and Substance: The New Zealand general election of 2017, edited by Professor Stephen Levine from the University’s Political Science and International Relations programme, is a collection of essays from party leaders, political commentators, academics and journalists about what happened during New Zealand’s volatile 2017 general election, and why.

 

The book contains chapters on a wide range of topics including the phenomenon of ‘Jacindamania’, the role of Māori electorates in the election, and the effect of political scandals. As well as exploring the personalities and forces that shaped the election, the book examines the legacy of the previous National Government. It also features political cartoons from the time of the election and is accompanied by a DVD containing commercials, debates, campaign hoardings, campaign footage, and election documents.


Speaking at the launch event, the Prime Minister said the book sheds light on the sometimes unpredictable 2017 election from a range of viewpoints. “This book is an artefact that brings to bear all of the different perspectives on what was … an extraordinary campaign across the board,” she said.

 “Projects like this are chronicles of our shared history—our debated history—and a celebration of our institutions.”

 Stardust and Substance is the latest title in a longstanding series of books that are published following the post-election conferences held at Parliament after every general election since 1987. The books are edited by members of the University's Political Science and International Relations programme, with Professor Levine having been involved as an editor since the 1996 election. The series was established by Emeritus Professor Dame Margaret Clark.

 A new feature of the latest instalment is that it contains chapters from international commentators sharing perspectives on the New Zealand election as seen from the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia, and Japan.

 Professor Levine says the book aims to make sense of the forces driving the 2017 general election and its outcome. “With 38 chapters from 46 contributors, this is the most wide-ranging book in this election series.

 “Informative and thought-provoking, the book is a record of an election and its aftermath, capturing a somewhat magical campaign and the serious matters of policy and politics that hinged on the outcome,” says Professor Levine.

 VUP Publisher Fergus Barrowman says there has already been a lot of interest in the volume, with a second reprint underway. “These books are an invaluable resource for all people interested in recent politics. The amount of early interest in this edition in particular is an encouraging sign of New Zealanders’ political engagement.”

 Stardust and Substance: The New Zealand general election of 2017, edited by Stephen Levine. Victoria University Press. Paperback, $40.00.

The Scotiabank Giller Prize Presents its 2018 Longlist


      September 17, 2018 (St. John’s, NL) – The Scotiabank Giller Prize is pleased to announce its longlist for this year’s award. The 2017 Prize winner, Michael Redhill, announced the list during a ceremony at The Rooms in St. John’s, NL. The 12 titles were chosen from a field of 104 books submitted by publishers all across Canada.

This year the Prize celebrates its 25th anniversary.

The longlist for the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize is:

  • Paige Cooper for her story collection Zolitude, published by A John Metcalf Book, an imprint of Biblioasis
  • Patrick DeWitt for his novel French Exit, published by House of Anansi Press
  • Eric Dupont for his novel Songs for the Cold of Heart, translated by Peter McCambridge, published by QC Fiction, an imprint of Baraka Books
  • Esi Edugyan for her novel Washington Black, published by Patrick Crean Editions, an imprint of HarperCollins Canada
  • Rawi Hage for his novel Beirut Hellfire Society, published by Knopf Canada
  • Sheila Heti for her novel Motherhood, published by Knopf Canada
  • Emma Hooper for her novel Our Homesick Songs, published by Hamish Hamilton Canada
  • Thea Lim for her novel An Ocean of Minutes, published by Viking Canada
  • Lisa Moore for her story collection Something for Everyone, published by Astoria, an imprint of House of Anansi Press
  • Tanya Tagaq for her novel Split Tooth, published by Viking Canada
  • Kim Thúy for her novel Vi, translated by Sheila Fischman, published by Random House Canada
  • Joshua Whitehead for his novel Jonny Appleseed, published by Arsenal Pulp Press
The longlist was selected by an esteemed five-member jury panel: Canadian writer and journalist Kamal Al-Solaylee (Jury Chair), playwright and Vice President of advancement for the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) Maxine Bailey, American writer John Freeman, English novelist Philip Hensher, and Canadian author Heather O'Neill.

Of the longlist, the jury wrote:

“We the jury devoted many, many delightful and arduous months of our lives coming up with this longlist. Our sole criteria going into this process was literary excellence. We were looking for books that were written in elevated, idiosyncratic, original prose that exhibited an exquisite command of the art of language, and unparalleled mastery of structure and storytelling. We argued viciously over books, expounding on their merits. But when the battle was over, what remained left us in awe. This list reflects the landscape of the current Canadian imagination: diverse, bold, edgy, exciting, reflective, aware, angry and joyous. Leave it to our literature to speak out beautifully from the far-flung edges of this huge mysterious land, and sing about the erased, the immigrants, the oppressed, the survivors, the entitled. It also reflects the myriad genres that Canadian writers are working in: auto-fiction, science-fiction, epic family sagas, historical novels, coming of age dramas, short-stories, satire. These are stories about and beyond Canada, a list so exciting, exhibiting such pure excellence, it stands up to any list in the world, and it is great, great fun to read.”


This year’s shortlist will be announced at a press event to be held at the Scotiabank Centre at Scotia Plaza in Toronto on Monday, October 1, at 11 a.m. ET. (Doors open at 10:30 a.m.)

Quotes


“I am just delighted for these twelve finalists. They have written extraordinary books that deserve to be read, and read widely. After 25 years, the Prize continues to do what it set out to do all those years ago – spotlight and promote Canadian writers and their books to Canada and the world. We hope to continue doing this work for another 25 years. We could not have done any of this without our most valued partner, Scotiabank. We thank them for their ongoing support and dedication to Canadian literature.”
-Elana Rabinovitch, Executive Director, Scotiabank Giller Prize

“This is an exciting year for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, as we join book lovers in celebrating the 25th anniversary of this important literary award. Scotiabank is proud to support Canada’s talented fiction writers through the Prize. We congratulate the longlisted authors for being recognized for their inspiring works and look forward to celebrating the finalists and winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize in November.”
- John Doig, Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Scotiabank

Between the Pages: An Evening with the Scotiabank Giller Prize Finalists
will take you inside the minds and creative lives of the writers on the 2018 shortlist. All venues are wheelchair accessible and an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter will be present.


The Scotiabank Giller Prize is delighted to present the Between the Pages series of readings featuring this year’s shortlisted authors, taking place in:
  • Calgary – October 11;
  • Vancouver – October 15;
  • Halifax – October 25;
  • Ottawa – October 30;
  • Toronto – November 5;
  • New York City – November 7; and,
  • London, U.K. – November 15.  
For more information, please visit: www.scotiabankgillerprize.ca/news-events/events-and-important-dates/

The 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize will air on Monday, November 19, on CBC at 8 p.m. (11:30 AT/12:00 NT) CBC Radio One at 8 p.m. (9 AT/ 9:30 NT) and will be livestreamed at CBCBooks.ca.

Audible, the world’s largest creator and distributor of audiobooks, is committed to supporting talented Canadian authors and narrators and is proud to be the exclusive audiobook sponsor of the Scotiabank Giller Prize.

About the Prize

The Giller Prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in 1994, highlights the very best in Canadian fiction year after year. In 2005, the prize teamed up with Scotiabank who increased the winnings 4-fold. The Scotiabank Giller Prize now awards $100,000 annually to the author of the best Canadian novel or short story collection published in English, and $10,000 to each of the finalists. The award is named in honour of the late literary journalist Doris Giller by her husband Toronto businessman Jack Rabinovitch, who passed away in August 2017.

About Scotiabank
Scotiabank is Canada's international bank and a leading financial services provider in the Americas. We are dedicated to helping our 25 million customers become better off through a broad range of advice, productsand services, including personal and commercial banking, wealth management and private banking, corporate and investment banking, and capital markets. With a team of more than 96,000 employees and assets of $947 billion (as at July 31, 2018), Scotiabank trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: BNS) and New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: BNS). For more information, please visit www.scotiabank.com and follow us on Twitter @Scotiabankviews.


About CBC/Radio-Canada
CBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairsand world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world.

About Audible, Inc.
Audible, Inc., an Amazon.com, Inc. subsidiary (NASDAQ: AMZN), is the leading provider of premium digital spoken audio content, offering customers a new way to enhance and enrich their lives every day. Audible was created to unleash the emotive music in language and the habituating power and utility of verbal expression. Audible content includes more than 375,000 audio programs from leading audiobook publishers, broadcasters, entertainers, magazine and newspaper publishers, and business information providers.

     

     

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Sue Wootton is recipient of the NZSA Peter & Diane Beatson Fellowship 2018


Dunedin writer Sue Wootton is recipient of the NZSA Peter & Dianne Beatson Fellowship 2018


Sue Wootton will use the fellowship to work on an historical novel. She says: 'I'm proud and delighted to be the recipient of the 2018 Peter and Dianne Beatson Fellowship. It's really invigorating to receive this vote of confidence in my project, and wonderful to know that I can now dedicate a sustained stretch of time to work on my second novel, which begins during the 1948 polio epidemic and explores the effects of this on one NZ family'.

Sue Wootton's poetry, fiction and essays are widely published in New Zealand and internationally, and her work has been recognised in a number of awards and competitions, including the International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, the Caselberg Poetry Prize, the Gwen Harwood Poetry Prize, the University of Canberra Vice Chancellor’s Prize, the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Short Story Competition and the NZ Poetry Society International Competition. Her debut novel, Strip (Mākaro Press), was longlisted for the fiction prize in the 2017 Ockham NZ Book Awards, and her fifth poetry collection, The Yield (Otago University Press) was a finalist in the 2018 poetry category of these prestigious national awards.

Selection panel convener David Hill commented: 'Sue Wootton is a versatile and much-admired writer, with a growing track record in both poetry and prose. Her sample of work is distinguished by writing that is both adventurous and accessible.'

This annual award is made possible with thanks to the generosity of the Beatson's. In establishing this fellowship, they have given NZ authors a valuable opportunity to be economically secure while they bring a project to completion.  It's a commitment and affirmation for New Zealand writers. The New Zealand Society of Authors (PEN NZ Inc) Te Puni Kaituhi O Aotearoa is most grateful.

In 2017 the fellowship was awarded to Jillian Sullivan who used the time to work on a collection of creative non-fiction essays (including poetry) set in Central Otago and with a strong conservation base. Previous recipients have included Tina MakeretiMichael HarlowEmma Neale, Mandy Hager, Carl Nixon, Glenn Colquhoun, Sue McCauley and Marilyn Duckworth.

We congratulate Sue Wootton and the other outstanding applicants shortlisted for 2018.
The New Zealand Society of Authors (PEN NZ Inc) Te Puni Kaituhi O Aotearoa

For further information and for media enquiries: Claire Hill, Operations Manager office@nzauthors.org.nz 09 3794801   authors.org.nz